Monthly Meditation – April 2011

“Joy, like thanksgiving, is at once a gift and a decision. They are nothing without both. God provides the occasion; we respond by entering. Turning away from the occasion, neither glorifying God nor thanking Him, blinds us to His presence and to the occasion He provides.”

From The Stepstool of Divine Ascent by Rev. Fr. John Konkle

(more…)

Share

Monthly Meditation – March 2011

ST. NIKOLAI VELIMIROVIC:

Commentary of the Sunday of Forgiveness and Fasting (abridged)

(more…)

Share

St. Ignatius Church iconostasis

St. Ignatius of Antioch Antiochian Orthodox Christian Church serves the Madison, Wisconsin area. Our membership includes Orthodox Christians of Middle Eastern, Greek, Russian, Coptic, Serbian and other ethnic backgrounds, as well as many who have come from Protestant and Catholic backgrounds. It is a youthful and dynamic parish which prays, serves the local community and socializes together.

Our Divine Services are all in English and sung a cappella.  Our Sunday Divine Liturgy begins at 10:00am and is approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes long.  A luncheon pot-luck coffee hour immediately follows Divine Liturgy.  All families and guests are encouraged to enjoy a light meal and, more importantly, share in fellowship.

For first time visitors to the Orthodox Church a good service to attend is the Saturday evening Great Vespers starting at 6:00pm (6:30 pm from June to the beginning of September) which is about 45 minutes long.  Here one will hear the beautiful melodies of the Byzantine and Russian traditions, prayers of petition, psalmody, and seasonal topics of celebration.   Inquirer’s Class is generally held every other week at 4:30pm (5:00 pm from June to the beginning of September) before Great Vespers (check calendar for exceptions).  This informal Q/A is a great opportunity to meet our priest, ask questions, and meet Orthodox Christians from the parish and other inquirers.  Our general schedule of services is here.

If you’re looking for additional online resources about Orthodoxy,  the Antiochian Archdiocese website,  Journey to Orthodoxy, and Ancient Faith Radio are sites we recommend.

If you have any questions, please contact us.

Share

Monthly Meditation – February 2011

“When God sees that we are proud and arrogant, He allows for the presences of temptations in our life. He will take them away from us only when He sees that we humble ourselves.”

Elder Paisios of the Holy Mountain

(more…)

Share

Monthly Meditation – January 2011

The Nativity and Epiphany:

The fullness of celebrating the coming of our Lord

By Father Nicholas Speier

In approaching the Christmas Feast and celebrating the beginning of the New Year (2009) we recall that the historic Christian center of this time of year is Epiphany (Theophany). The Church in her wisdom has placed these feasts together so we might experience the fullness of celebrating the coming of our Lord.

The Nativity of our Lord is a feast of joy, but at Epiphany the joy is greater still. In the stable cave we see God becoming man and sanctifying humanity, and we see His humility and His love for us. But at Epiphany we see the greater work of sanctifying all of creation in the baptismal water. We know from our reading of the Gospel of St. John that Christ came to save not only man but all of creation.

The Nativity has the angel proclaiming glad tidings, but at Epiphany the forerunner prepares the way. At His birth Christ brought us the message of peace on earth and good will toward man, a true sign of His condescending love. But at Epiphany we see the forerunner preparing the way for all humanity to walk in peace and good will. For God not only wants us to know about life in Him but to live our life in Him.

The Nativity has blood spilt, as Bethlehem wails in her childlessness, but at Epiphany this water gives way to many sons. As Christ is born, this world begins its rejection of the Savior to end at His crucifixion and death. But at the Baptism of Christ we see that His presence can not be stamped out. He is forever making things new through death and resurrection and the new children of God entering the Kingdom through Baptismal water.

At the Nativity, the star proclaims Christ to the Wise men, but at Epiphany the Father reveals Christ to the whole universe. Mary and Joseph quietly come into Bethlehem and Christ is born of her amidst a few, but now at Epiphany the Father's voice declares to all men, angels, and all creation that Christ is the Beloved and only begotten Son of the Father.

As we can see, the two feasts together help us to experience the fullness of the coming of our Lord. They emphasize his humility in lowering himself to save us, His beloved. The two feasts declare to us, beyond doubt, God's great love for mankind and all creation. He did not wait for us to make things better or right, but He came to us in our distress to save us and to save this world. May the depth and joy of these celebrations lift our spirits so we may rejoice with the angels and all the saints at the coming of Christ our Lord.

Share